Leading Up

4 ways to coach your boss

When I started in the fire service I used to think that “coaching” was always from the top down. After all, in fire school the instructors coached us to build skill as an individual while also learning to work as a team. As a probie on the job, I was coached by my captain and other senior firefighters about our policies and procedures, and how to do the “real work” of a firefighter. And as I promoted through the ranks, I continued to be a student of the fire service where I was coached by many chief officers, including the fire chief.

briefing-fote

There are many opportunities to coach and be coached. Photo by Billy Schmidt

We think that the only type of coaching in the fire service is from the top-down. However, I found many situations where I could actually coach my boss. And on several occasions, I was the boss who was being coached. But it only works well if it’s done right.

Having been in all positions from a firefighter, to company and chief officer, I have found opportunities to coach and be coached.

Coaching Up and Down

Once you’re a senior firefighter or an officer, you’re usually coaching somebody who is under you, somebody who reports to you somewhere in the chain of command. And most fire departments follow a strict, or at least somewhat orderly hierarchy. So it’s rare to think about coaching a senior firefighter or your officer. Or, even one of your peers.

But sometimes it has to be done. And if you’re going to be a leader, you have to learn how to do this, because there are going to be people who are above you that are hurting or inhibiting what you do. The things that you’re trying to accomplish. And if you don’t coach them for better behavior and relationships, it’s not good for anybody. Ultimately, it’s not good for the fire department.

I’ve been the officer who was doing things that sometimes clouded efficiency and weakened execution. On many occasions, if it hadn’t been for a company officer coming to me and saying, “Chief, are you aware that you’re doing such-and-such..?” I would have continued to harm our progress. I had no idea because my situation awareness was limited. I was too focused on either the demands of my boss or what “I” thought was important or how to do it.

I was grateful because it was good for me. I grew as a person and as a leader. It was good for my team and my fire department because I didn’t continue to do those “knuckle-head” things that hurt our ability to be safe and effectively execute in emergency situations.

4 Ways to Coach Your Boss

Not everyone can be coached. More importantly, there’s a special way to do this to increase the probability that it will work. How do you give this kind of input in the right way? Here are 4 considerations to help you coach your boss.

  1. Check the weather before going there. We’re all people; even our bosses. We all have good weather and bad weather days. You will increase your probability of success if you approach them when the weather is good. Make sure the situation is right for this kind of conversation. Avoid the thunderstorms and take advantage of the sunny days. Timing is everything.
  2. Be humble. Part of being a leader is being humble. What this means is, keep your mind open. Be open to ideas and reasons that you weren’t aware of. Your way may not really be the best way. Make it a two-way dialogue situation. We learn and grow from each other.
  3. Make sure it really matters. It has to matter. In other words, why is it important? What kind of impact will it have on the situation and the people involved?
  4. Just go for it. Yes, go ahead and take the risk. If the weather is right, your humble, and it’s something that really matters then just go for it. Leadership is about risk taking and there’s no better way to build strong relationships and grow your fire department than to be able to coach both up and down.

Leading up is not easy. And you’re not going to get it right every time, but these four considerations should give you a good framework for having those difficult conversations. Imagine what can be done if your fire department can get to the point where there is coaching both up and down the organization. It would make a difference.

Here’s a great resource for coaching all around your organization.

One Leadership Style That Covers It All

Daredevil photographer Antonio Grambone, 46, photographed forest fires in the National Park of Cilento and Vallo di Diano in the province of Salerno in Italy.

Daredevil photographer Antonio Grambone, 46, photographed forest fires in the National Park of Cilento and Vallo di Diano in the province of Salerno in Italy.

Via Wiselike:

Do you advocate the same leadership style for all industries? Why or why not? Each industry has different qualities. For instance, people put their lives on the line when they work in fire safety, while retail is about money. Because industries are so different, should leadership styles be different as well? If so, which styles work best for industries such as public safety, health, and retail?

Here’s my answer:

I believe one leadership style works best across all industries. Here’s why.

In the 1990’s, I flew air ambulance trips moving sick and injured patients from one part of the world to another. On one occasion, we were transporting a gentleman from Chicago to Boca Grande, Florida. He was interested in what we did (I was a paramedic and my partner was a nurse) and how we worked as a team of two in a small metal tube (a Lear Jet) flying 400 MPH through the clouds. After thoroughly questioning us, I asked him what he did. He said he owned and operated several companies, describing a variety of organizations ranging from manufacturing to service businesses. I asked him how he knew so much about so many different businesses? He said, “Oh, I know a lot about one thing: How to lead people.”

I believe he’s right. He had one leadership style: servant leadership. He created a bond with the people he worked with and the people his companies provided goods and services to.

The parallels between leading in high-stakes business and leading in high-risk situations are quite the same. Competence, trust, and loyalty are qualities that span across a variety of areas. Whether it’s retail (selling things), non-profits (supporting people and causes), or healthcare (healing people) all involve people and require leaders who are inherently motivated and embrace learning (competent) and have a strong relationship with their followers (trust and loyalty).

I believe that’s servant leadership.

Not paying attention to outliers can be a tremendous cost.

L. David Marquet, former submarine commander and author of Turn the Ship Around!: A True Story of Turning Followers into Leaders, suggests that when we discover an outlying position we should create a mindset of “they may be right and I may be wrong,” and then explore it.

Keep your mind open to find new opportunities, understand others, and manage uncertainty.

Embrace the outliers!

Another great learning source is Malcolm Gladwell’s book, Outliers: The Story of Success.

IAFC President Testifies Before Senate on Responding to New Terror Threats

FIREFIGHTERNATION
February 3, 2016

As I wrote in a recent blog post on What’s next for the fire Service?, open-mindedness and a far-reaching vision will keep the fire service in the game.

After several unexpected, mass-civilian attacks on U.S. soil in 2015, the fire service will have to provide a more unified response to these new security threats. More use of a rescue task force approach combining law enforcement, fire, and EMS will be required. That means an even better relationship between those services and much more practice together to work out the kinks!

Read this article and watch the video testimony.

Watch Your Attitude

Make sure you are doing something and not just being something

What matters more than the type of service (I am a firefighter) is the heart behind the service (I help people).

Our PBCFR 3rd Battalion Challenge Coin reminds us of "what we do."

Our PBCFR 3rd Battalion Challenge Coin reminds us of “what we do.”

A misplaced attitude works against the mission (save lives and protect property) and the safety of others.

Make sure you are doing something (serving) and not just being something (a firefighter).

Gordan Graham And True Risk Management

The Status Quo is gone..... Continual improvement has got to be the rule of life

Gordan Graham just makes sense. He has a knack for opening our eyes and connecting us with true reality. What do we really see? What is actually happening? And what should we do about it?

gordangraham

Graham champions safety and effectiveness in the public safety world; a place filled with constant complexity and chaos. In a recent Firehouse blog, he speaks on the topic of risk management at the Fire Department Safety Officers Association (FDSOA) Symposium.

He reminds us of the simple message that if it’s predictable, it’s preventable:

If we can identify the cause of the tragedy, perhaps we can put together control measures to prevent similar tragedies from occurring.

He reveals that we are part of the problem:

The truth is we don’t know jack about risk management, he said of people who work for government public safety agencies. We get all worked up about the wrong things.

He explains that tragedies have multiple causes, including proximate cause, contributory cause, root causes and other problems lying in wait. Look at the root cause of the problem. Don’t just focus on the immediate or proximate cause. He said, “Everybody knows it was the iceberg that sank the Titanic, but was it the real cause?” We must look deeper.

Here are 7 rules of risk management that Graham suggests we follow:

  1. You must have a rising standard of quality over time and well beyond what is required by any minimum standard.
  2. People running complex systems should be highly capable.
  3. Supervisors have to face bad news when it comes and take problems to high level enough to fix those problems.
  4. You must have a healthy respect for the dangers and risk of your particular job.
  5. Training must be constant and rigorous.
  6. You must have a robust audit process to assure that what you say you are doing you are, in fact doing.
  7. The organization and members thereof must have the ability and willingness to learn from mistakes of the past.

Probably the most important areas in the fire service that we should put more focus on is the leader influence in dangerous contexts. As leaders, we must be adaptable and agile, able to balance high risk situations with low frequency operations. As Gordan Graham suggests, continual improvement by keeping our eyes on the real problems, then working together to solve them, is our rule of life.

Here are some Gordan Graham sources:

FIREHOUSE Blog by Ed Ballam: FDSOA Symposium: Graham Lectures on True Risk Managment

You Tube video featuring Gordan Graham on High Risk, Low Frequency Events

Looking Ahead To 2016: What’s Next For The Fire Service?

Open-mindedness and a far-reaching vision will keep the fire service in the game

From data-driven decisions to a rise in prevention, expanded duties, and increased threat response, the fire service will continue to change in the upcoming year. More rapidly than ever before.

Change is happening more rapidly than ever before.

Change is happening more rapidly than ever before.

Yes, “continue to change” is something the fire service, reluctantly, will do this year. And this change will begin to accelerate more because of the unique nature of our fast-changing and complex world. Keeping pace with technology and the increased demands and challenges in our communities will drive us even more to make this change. A “status quo” strategy will not work; open-mindedness and a far-reaching vision will keep the fire service in the game.

A far-reaching vision will keep the fire service

Open-mindedness and a far-reaching vision will keep the fire service in the game.

Revisioning The Fire Service

Threat Response

After several unexpected, mass-civilian attacks on U.S. soil in 2015, the fire service will have to provide a more unified response to these new security threats. More use of a rescue task force approach combining law enforcement, fire, and EMS will be required. That means an even better relationship between those services and much more practice together to work out the kinks!

A Rise In Fire Prevention

The community sees us fighting fire, but they rarely see us preventing fire through inspections, code enforcement, and education. Fighting fire is, and always will be, needed. But our overall mission to save lives and protect property should have just as much, if not more, emphasis before the fire.

Data Driven Decisions

More decisions are made by data today. Data provides a better picture of past history and future trends that can identify safer practices, more effective strategies, and lower operating costs. Expect more radical approaches to the long-rooted staffing and deployment models to meet changing needs throughout the communities and peak demand times.

Expanded Duties

Saving lives and protecting property is why the fire service exists. But it will mean more than just fighting fires. Fire departments can expect to be called on and used for more emergency and non-emergency situations than ever before. More education to increase situation awareness and decision making combined with a strong skill-based training will be required to meet a multitude of dangerous and chaotic situations.

More information. The need for more prevention. More things to do and more threats coming our way. Open-mindedness and a far reaching vision will keep the fire service in the “game of change” this year.

What changes do you see coming in 2016? How will you address them?

My One Word For 2016: Improvisation

Discover your one word to simplify what you do and inspire you to do something new

A couple of years ago I read the book One Word that will Change Your Life. And it did.myoneword

Since then, instead of a New Year’s Resolution goal I choose one word to focus on for the year. It’s more visionary than just setting goals, and it becomes my guiding principle or ethos.

The Difference Between Goals and Visions

Goals

Goals are specific and measurable. We like to call them SMART goals (specific, measurable, achievable, realistic, and time-bound). They have endpoints and once achieved, you’re done. Goals tell us WHAT we need to do.

Here’re a couple of examples of goals:

  • I will read 2 books each month
  • I will loose 10 pounds by April 1, 2016

Visions

A vision, on the other hand, is more of a broad idea of HOW you will look or feel in the future. It’s HOW you imagine yourself. Unlike goals, it’s not specific but very open-minded. A vision is harder to put into words, but somehow, it’s a little easier to encompass with one word.

My Previous One Words

In 2014 I chose simplicity, first because I was approaching retirement from my fire department, and second because I had been diagnosed with cancer (this was my second battle in 14 years) and was now responding positively to treatment. That year was the beginning of a major transformation in my life style. Reducing some of life’s clutter, including debt and stuff, and adapting to a less decision-intense world would make my life simpler.

For the year 2015 I remembered the Jimmy Buffett song, Survive. This was a year full of unexpected health snags that attacked my body and my mind. And while I had my share of struggles (recovering from major surgery and being diagnosed and successfully treated for a third time with cancer) in 2015 I did survive. So that was a good word for that year.

My One Word For 2016

Each of my one words has become a foundation to build on for the next year, and this year’s word lifts me even higher. My 2016 word is simply improvisation. Now that I am well into my transformation from a full-time firefighter (I’m still teaching and writing) and feeling better, I will spend less time planning or dreaming and more time doing. I will make more leaps and venture farther and experience new things. I will step outside of my comfort zone.

Discover Your One Word

Using the one word concept can help you, your family, your team, or your organization simplify what you do and inspire you to do something new, better, or more fun. Here are a few resources to help you find your one word:

Read the book One Word that will Change Your Life

Watch John Saddington’s Vlog One Word: Team

Visit GetOneWord.com